In a Houston suburb, power failures are familiar. Crunching snow is not.By Allyson Waller

On Monday, Cheryl Rodriguez and her husband woke up to heaps of snow outside of their house, nestled in a neighborhood cul-de-sac in Conroe, Texas, about 40 miles north of Houston.

“This is just awesome — we haven’t seen this,” said Ms. Rodriguez, who has lived in the area for almost 50 years. “It’s just beautiful, and it’s fun to hear your feet crunch in the snow.”

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Credit…Allyson Waller/The New York Times

Though the snow was an unusual experience for the couple, the power failures were all too familiar. This past hurricane season, storms ravaged parts of the South, particularly in Louisiana, and affected Texas’ power grids.

A winter storm warning is in effect for the Conroe area until Monday evening, according to the National Weather Service, and rolling power outages have been ongoing throughout Texas.

Across the state, at least 2.8 million customers had lost power, according to PowerOutage.us, which aggregates data from utilities across the country. In an interview with ABC13, Mayor Sylvester Turner of Houston said: “Don’t expect the power to come back in on in hour or so. It might be the rest of the day, if not longer.”

Houston set a record low temperature of 17 degrees, the National Weather Service said, beating the former record of 18 degrees from 1905.

After taking a small walk around her home, Ms. Rodriguez said she planned to spend the day inside quilting and swapping her Valentine’s Day decorations for the upcoming Easter season, and avoiding driving.

“Every time I put on the brakes, it felt like I was going to skid off the road,” she said, adding that in Texas, “we’re just not equipped here for that.”

The couple’s black Labrador retriever, Angel, seemed to thoroughly enjoy the snow, although she did seem apprehensive at first.

“When we took her out this morning, she put her paws on that snow and she immediately withdrew her paws real quick,” Ms. Rodriguez said. “Then all of sudden she just took off in that snow and just started running back and forth, back and forth across the back yard.”

Ms. Rodriguez said she’s grateful their home has gas so they’re able to use their stove and fireplace, although she said: “I wish I had a generator. In fact after this, I may end up putting one in my house.”

Across the state, at least 2.8 million customers had lost power, according to PowerOutage.us, which aggregates data from utilities across the country. In an interview with ABC13, Mayor Sylvester Turner of Houston said: “Don’t expect the power to come back in on in hour or so. It might be the rest of the day, if not longer.”

Houston set a record low temperature of 17 degrees, the National Weather Service said, beating the former record of 18 degrees from 1905.

After taking a small walk around her home, Ms. Rodriguez said she planned to spend the day inside quilting and swapping her Valentine’s Day decorations for the upcoming Easter season, and avoiding driving.

“Every time I put on the brakes, it felt like I was going to skid off the road,” she said, adding that in Texas, “we’re just not equipped here for that.”

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